You can work with recipes in various ways:

  • test a recipe to run a single trigger event through the recipe logic

  • start a recipe to have it pick up trigger events

  • stop a recipe to have it stop processing new trigger events

  • use skip step to build and test your recipes incrementally

During recipe development, we recommend building and testing in small chunks. To enter test mode, click Test jobs or the Test button in the top right corner of the Recipe editor.


Starting Recipes

Starting a recipe will cause it to pick up trigger events and process them through the recipe. When a recipe is started, it becomes active.

Starting a recipe with a real-time trigger (like those in the Hive connector) will result in the recipe immediately listening for the specified events, with the specified trigger conditions. It will keep fetching events until the recipe is stopped.

When a recipe with trigger time intervals is first started, it will fetch trigger events from the 'when first started, this recipe should pick up events from' configuration. Subsequently, it will continuously process these events. If you had defined the Since/From date during testing previously, this date cannot be changed again for this recipe


Stopping Recipes

Stopping a recipe makes it inactive. It will stop picking up trigger events. Recipes have to be stopped to make changes to the recipe, or to rename the recipe.

Real-time triggers powered by webhooks (like those in the Hive connector) will trigger events that occur during the time that the recipe is running. If the recipe was stopped triggers will not be picked up by the recipe during the time of inactivity.

Recipes with trigger intervals will continue where they have left off when a recipe is restarted from a stopped state. For example, if it was stopped on Monday, and started again from Thursday, the recipe will fetch all trigger events since Monday and process them.


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